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http://www.thedailynewsonline.com/lifestyles/article_7150ea78-d493-11e4-a623-af5360f2468c.html


'I know that is is important to improve food sources in East Timor, but the damage done to peoples health in the West through firms like Monsanto and other processing plants should also  be taught.  As a rule of thumb it is much better to stick to what you grow, farm or fish, rather than start making food that is produced in a factory. Many people in Britain are going back to growing there own food and there is a big movement against factory farming. Lidia Tindle - Tyneside East Timor Solidarity

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2007/05/18/timor-killings-news-withheld

Link to SBS story

(Reuters) - East Timor's president chose former health minister Rui Araujo to be the new prime minister of the poverty-stricken country, the government said on Tuesday.

Araujo replaces independence hero Xanana Gusmao, who stepped down last week to allow for a younger generation to lead.

Gusmao, 68, and his ruling CNRT party recommended that Araujo take the helm even though the New Zealand-trained doctor is from the opposition Fretilin party.

"The president of the republic accepted the proposal of CNRT, the most voted party at the last legislative elections, which nominated Dr Rui Maria Araujo for the post as prime minister," the government said in a statement.

Araujo is expected to be sworn in this week as East Timor's fifth prime minister since it gained independence from Indonesia in 2002.

"Rui's appointment should transform Timorese politics by ushering in a new period of cross-party cooperation," said Cillian Nolan, deputy director of a Jakarta-based think-tank, the Institute for Policy Analysis of Conflict.

"The challenge will be to cultivate the same kind of authority and credibility as his predecessor."

Many believe Gusmao, who became prime minister in May 2007 after serving as the first post-independence president, will maintain influence in government. But it is not clear what role he might take.

East Timor has struggled to develop economically since independence. Despite gas production worth billions of dollars, around half of the country's population of 1.2 million lives in poverty, the World Bank says.

East Timor is trying to develop more of its natural resources to boost employment and government revenue.

It is in talks with Australia's Woodside Petroleum to resolve a decades-long row over the Greater Sunrise project, which remains undeveloped 40 years after the gas fields were discovered.

Indonesia invaded East Timor in 1975, after Portugal abruptly pulled out of a colony it had ruled for three centuries, and annexed the territory later that year, maintaining a heavy and at times brutal military presence for decades.

(Writing by Randy Fabi; Editing by Robert Birsel)

East Timor's president accepted the resignation of independence hero Xanana Gusmao as prime minister on Monday, paving the way for a major government overhaul and a new chapter in the nation's short history.

Gusmao, who has served as either president or premier since East Timor became independent in 2002 following a long struggle against Indonesian occupation, submitted his resignation last week.

The departure of the former guerrilla fighter deprives Asia's youngest nation of a unifying figure who has helped resolve numerous crises, but analysts say it is time for Gusmao to step aside to enable a transition to a new generation of leaders.

At a Cabinet meeting, President Taur Matan Ruak announced "that he accepted the request for resignation", said the government in a statement.

It said the president would now start the process of forming a new government, and "it is expected that the constitution of the new government will be concluded at the end of this week".

A successor for 68-year-old Gusmao has not yet been announced but the frontrunner is seen as former health minister Rui Araujo. Gusmao may remain in government but in a lesser role, observers predict.

Gusmao, who spent years living in the jungle during Indonesian occupation, had signalled over the past year that he would be stepping down. But he delayed the move repeatedly as he sought to ensure everything was in place for a smooth transition.

- Easing political tensions -

Analysts say the cabinet reshuffle is likely aimed at getting rid of several ministers from Gusmao's coalition who have been accused of corruption.

It is also expected that the opposition Fretilin party will be brought into government, a move aimed at easing the half-island nation's often fraught politics.

Gusmao last week urged people "not to panic" during the transition to a new government, and called on everyone to "contribute towards stability".

East Timor has suffered bouts of unrest in the past, although recent years have been largely peaceful, allowing UN peacekeepers finally to leave the country in 2012.

Gusmao led the military wing of the Revolutionary Front for an Independent East Timor, which fought against Indonesian occupation. Before Indonesia invaded in 1975, Portugal had ruled East Timor for centuries.

He was captured by the Indonesians and imprisoned in Jakarta during the final years of the occupation, but kept up the independence struggle from behind bars.

After the Timorese voted overwhelmingly for independence in a UN-backed referendum in 1999, Gusmao returned to his homeland a hero and was elected the country's first president in 2002. He has been prime minister since 2007.

He is credited with resolving numerous crises in the chaotic early years of independence.

He urged reconciliation, persuading pro-Indonesian militiamen who had gone on a murderous rampage following the referendum to return home.

Gusmao also helped to keep a lid on communal tensions after a crisis in 2006, when soldiers sacked from the army launched a mutiny that sparked factional violence which left dozens dead and forced 150,000 into camps.

He remains hugely popular but has struggled to fulfil his pledges of improving livelihoods in the deeply poor country, and diversifying the economy away from oil and gas.

Oil dispute prompts East Timor PM to stay.

VETERAN East Timorese leader Xanana Gusmao says he's pushing back plans to stand down as the fledgling nation's prime minister as his fledgling nation continues to dispute oil revenues with Australia.

GUSMAO told The Associated Press in an interview on Thursday he'd intended to resign this September, but will now stay on until the first half of 2015, as East Timor grapples with disputes over oil revenues with Canberra and US energy giant ConocoPhillips.

He said he remained committed to transferring leadership responsibilities to a younger generation, but declined to say who might succeed him. "If I suddenly leave without stabilising these issues it's like running away from your responsibility," Gusmao said ahead of his address on Thursday to the annual gathering of world leaders at the United Nations. The 68-year-old was a leader of East Timor's 24-year resistance against a brutal Indonesian military occupation that left more than 170,000 dead. He was elected the nation's first president after independence in 2002 and became prime minister in 2007. The half-island nation is struggling with high rates of poverty and meeting post-independence expectations, but Gusmao said he didn't believe there would be repeat of the unrest if the country's elite was unified. Ties with Australia have been strained by a legal dispute over a 2006 treaty that carves up revenue from oil and gas under the sea between the countries. "We are not desperate for more dollars, but it must be recognised that resources within our maritime borders are ours," Gusmao said. East Timor alleges Canberra spied in order to gain an advantage during the negotiations over the treaty. It has taken Australia to the United Nations' highest court in The Hague over the seizure of documents from a lawyer working for East Timor in the arbitration case. The two nations recently agreed to try to settle those differences outside the International Court of Justice, but Gusmao said if the negotiations did not yield a satisfactory response, East Timor would resume litigation. East Timor is also in arbitration proceedings with ConocoPhillips over what it alleges are unpaid tax revenues from the company's operations at a joint petroleum development area between Australia and East Timor. Source: theaustralian

Sydney Morning Herald
Tom Allard  National Affairs Editor

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/government-wants-east-timor-spy-charged-20140831-10aoad.html

Following link is an ABC tv report on the Clinic:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-08-12/health-workers-in-east-timor-battle-to-treat-preventable-disease/5663508

Having telephoned your office I was advised  to look at the statement on your web site regarding your investments  in the arms trade to see if my concerns re these investments have been allayed.

I am pleased to note that you are conducting an urgent review into where money raised by an innocent public is invested and that you have withdrawn the shares relating to BAE Systems until the review is completed.

However, I urge that you put out a statement confirming that you will never again invest money  with BAE Systems or any other arms company. Arms dealers are very cunning and can make investors believe that countries need weapons for the purpose of defence,  so it is okay to invest your money with them. This is of course untrue,  the decimation of countries and killing of innocent civilians is really what supporting the arms trade means.

That you then have projects in countries torn apart by war to alleviate poverty and suffering does not excuse your investing in this trade, a trade I would link to the slave trade, making money out of death and destruction, for much of the poverty and suffering has been caused directly by  weapons that have maimed, killed, destroyed infrastructure and decimated ways of life.

I have seen the devastation first hand in East Timor, a country independent since 1999, but still  struggling against a brutal occupation of 25 years by the Indonesian military, made possible  by the purchase of Hawk Jets and other weapons manufactured by BAE systems and Heckler and Koch. Many of the weapons were purchased by soft loans given to its government by our government.  It will take years to heal the scars of the  many who were maimed and had family murdered,  every family in East Timor lost at least one member of their family murdered, indeed one third of the population was killed within the first 3  years of occupation.  Villages, towns and its capital city were destroyed, infrastructure was decimated, rebuilding the country is a huge task,  adding  to the trauma the population is suffering.

This is one country, imagine the destruction, resulting in loss of life and poverty, caused by weapons manufactured by BAE systems  on a world wide scale.  Investors in the trade are in many ways saying it is fine to carry on in this way as long as we have good returns for our money.

I once more urge you to desist in supporting this trade in any way

Lidia Tindle

Posted: 09 August 2012 0108 hrs

DILI: Timor Leste's president swore in the nation's new coalition cabinet Wednesday, announcing three additional ministerial posts that the opposition has dubbed an "unnecessary" use of the poor nation's money.

President Taur Matan Ruak announced 16 ministers, three more than the former government. Six are from Prime Minister Xanana Gusmao's National Congress for Timorese Reconstruction (CNRT), which leads the coalition government after winning the general election in July.

"I am satisfied with this structure. But what I ask of you all, the new ministers, is that you work efficiently. I also ask that you don't repeat the mistakes made by past ministers," Ruak said, after corruption allegations marred the former cabinet.

Fernando "Lasama" de Araujo, president of the minority Democratic Party (PD) that joined the coalition after the CNRT failed to win an absolute majority, will be deputy prime minister and minister for social welfare.

Jose Luis Guterres of minority Frente-Mudanca, another ally, was appointed foreign affairs minister.

The size of the new cabinet, with three additional ministerial posts, drew criticism, especially from the ranks of the opposition Fretilin Party, which came second to the CNRT in the July legislative elections.

Fretilin said the government's creation of new ministries was wasteful for the tiny half-island nation of just 1.1 million people, half of whom live under the international poverty line.

"This will increase spending on government ministers and vice ministers, and it's completely unnecessary for such a small country," Fretilin vice president Aresenio Babo told AFP upon seeing an earlier draft list.

"The only explanation is creating jobs for friends to satisfy coalition and individual interests."

Michael Leach of Australia's Swinburne University in Melbourne said that the Timorese would judge over the five-year term whether the spending had been in the public's interest.

"Ultimately, the public will decide if their performance justifies the extra cost, or if it's seen as a form of reward to governing party members and supporters," he said.

Timor Leste won independence from Indonesia in 2002 after a bloody 24-year occupation.

Presidential and legislative elections this year were seen as key tests of the nation's stability as UN peacekeepers plan to pull out of the once restive country by the end of the year.

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